Imperfect Ecosystems . . . reflect Hope!

Note the “Nictating membrane” on this Stilts eye; nictitating membrane is a transparent or translucent third eyelid present in some animals that can be drawn across the eye for protection and to moisten it while maintaining visibility

One day a few months back decided to grab my camera and walk after the rain. Clouds dispersed and I figured might get some great shots of glistening drops amongst the reeds and instead came across a nesting stilt! Heard of these birds before, caught glimpses of them flying away, their long pink legs dancing in the air, however this day would be categorized as another SUDDENLY from nature’s heart, viewing a lone parent sitting on what had to be a nest!

Why else would she be sitting on a clump of grass in the middle of no where?  The rains in Florida can be torrential and ravaging, privately wondering if this was a nest at all, maybe the bird was sick and then lo and behold SHE STOOD UP!

And by golly by gee there were three eggs or maybe four! She started twirling them gently with her long beak and I just started snapping away what was happening. It was amazing to me that the nest survived at all the latest downpour!

Honestly would never think this was a nest at all! How could these little ones ever survive the elements was my only thought when leaving this day. Three days later I returned to the site and this is what I found. A baby stilt had emerged and survived despite the apparent imperfect home, nature had sustained herself.  I was allowed to witness “Reflected Innocence”, again hot tears rolled down my face

When I heard the torrential rains that made my own roof leak, said a silent prayer for this little nest, how could they survive?  My prayer was answered or maybe, it just led me to seek the answer which was hidden from my heart, because of ignorance, to what has always been.  Now I could see.

10 22 WWetlands 011_

Here is a quick clip of what we witnessed. This is where the stilt nest was in the picture above and to the right on the film. As I walk with my camera and catch these Florida birds coming in to roost,  you can hear their beaks snap, see them fly in, hear the sounds of nature in their habitation. Amazing indeed

Reading about nature is fine, but if a person walks in the woods and listens carefully, he can learn more than what is in books, for they speak with the voice of God.
George Washington Carver


About Brenda

"Brenda adores the birds. She is enchanted with their grace, their beauty. It was the birds and being out among them that gave her the peace she so needed and forged a new passion She uses a camera to capture those incredible moments, to savor them and share them with others. For her the camera was freedom. Brenda spent her life healing others, and dealing with incredible pain and despair. The world of birds and nature and photography was what she turned to in order to see the beautiful side of the world" Eric Curtis Cummings
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15 Responses to Imperfect Ecosystems . . . reflect Hope!

  1. jo heroux says:

    How soothing! Thank you, my friend for sharing your love.

  2. terri says:

    As always Brenda, you have captured the heart of God in your filming. Your passion has touched the voice of our own heart cry, we cry for family, for community which your film has shown. For He teaches us that even in nature, we need each other, we have to commune. This is strength!!!

  3. Leigh Young says:

    You were chosen to witness that and capture it on film! Thank you for sharing with those of us who do not live in an area to witness such as that.

  4. Lorik says:

    Great bird pics – and their environment too:)

  5. So amazing. I love having Ibis root in the yard for grubs and storks and herons land on our dock but I’ve never seen so many coming home to roost. Your site, with your beautiful photos, is one I always share with Rob.

  6. Brenda says:

    Thanks Kelly!! Not sure who Rob is but that’s great! 😉

  7. Joyce says:

    Beautiful pictures and post. You need to send your story into National Geographic magazine and get paid for this. Seriously. Take the post down so that it’s not published anymore and collect your money on this sales worthy article. I’d be shocked if they didn’t buy your story and pictures. Good luck!

    http://joycelansky.blogspot.com

    • Brenda says:

      Joyce you are so kind. I have no idea how to even approach NG or how to “sell” an article. It’s a passion nature, so extremely amazing So thankful you enjoyed!!

  8. Jane Gravois says:

    Thanks for sharing! beautiful! and the stilt and baby are wonderful to see up close! We used to go out each sunset in the canoe and watch the birds come in to roost. It’s been 2 years or more since the water level has been high enough to do that! Now we walk out to a prairie and see them fly over. Keep up the beautiful photos!

    • Brenda says:

      Oh Jane thank you; we will! Was just sharing with my husband how fortunate we are to be blessed with these sights. Will pray your water level rises. . .maybe in your county they could do something similar as they have done here by giving back to the community. Here is their web site which explains how Wakodahatchee Wetlands was achieved!! http://www.pbcgov.com/waterutilities/wakodahatchee/what_is_wakodahatchee.htm

      • Jane Gravois says:

        Wow! Glad to see that was implemented and is successful! I know many places in the U.S. have water reclamation areas. Hopefully more will get on board! We are located on Orange Lake in Marion Co-the water levels have changed form high to low and back again over the years according to weather patterns and now due to water usage. The wildlfe adjusts as do the people who use the lake for fishing, gator/duck hunting and pleasure.

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